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Cherokee Heritage Center


category : Museums
Cherokee Heritage Center The Cherokee Heritage Center, operated by the Cherokee National Historical Society, is located three miles south of Tahlequah, on the original site of the Cherokee Female Seminary. This remote area, covered with dense underbrush, was cleared in the mid-1960s and transformed into an attraction Newsweek magazine once called, "One of America's Top Ten Off-the-Road Locations." The Ancient Village at Tsa-La-Gi opened in 1967 and gave visitors a glimpse of pre-contact Cherokee lifestyle.

The Cherokee Heritage Center offers many attractions and exhibits, like the Ancient Village, Adams Corner Rural Village, the Cherokee National Museum, the Museum Shop and the Trail of Tears Exhibit.


Admission: $8.50 Adults, $7.50 College Students w/ID, $7.50 Seniors (55 +), $5 Youth (5-18). Free under 5 and CNHS members.
Hours: Open daily, Mon-Sat, 10am-5pm / Sun 1pm-5pm. Closed month of January
Address: 3 miles south of Tahlequah on US Highway 62
Phone: 888-999-6007
Our Email: info@cherokeeheritage.org
Our Website:www.CherokeeHeritage.org
Admission price includes access to the Cherokee National Museum, villages and genealogy center. Entry to the grounds and museum store are free.

Come visit us in Tahlequah, Oklahoma

Attractions and Upcoming Events

Tsa-La-Gi Outdoor Theater

Also located on the grounds of the Cherokee Heritage Center is the Tsa-La-Gi Theater, a 1,200

Tahlequah, OK Theatres

Statue of Liberty Replica

With the faith and courage of their forefathers who made possible the freedom of these United States.

The Boy Scouts of America

Dedicated this replica of the statue of liberty as a pledge of everlasting fidelity and loyalty.

Tahlequah, OK Monuments


Seminary Hall at Northeastern State University

This four-year regional university has a long and colorful heritage which began in 1846 when the Cherokee National Council authorized establishment of the National Male Seminary and National Female Seminary.

Tahlequah, OK Historic Buildings

The Cherokee Advocate

The Cherokee Advocate
Vol 1, Tahlequah, Cherokee Nation, Thursday, September 9, 1844

As a tribute to Oklahoma's first legal newspaper, The Cherokee Advocate, was established in 1844 in a building approximately 100' from the location (of this maker.)

Tahlequah, OK Monuments

Murrell Home

The Murrell Home was built in the new Cherokee Nation about 1845 by George M. Murrell. Murrell was a native Virginain who married Minerva Ross in 1834. Minerva was a member of a wealthy mixed-blood Cherokee/Scottish family, and the niece of Chief John Ross.

Tahlequah, OK Museums

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