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The Cherokee National Museum


category : Museums
The Cherokee National Museum The Cherokee National Museum is the only facility devoted to the preservation of the heritage of the Cherokee Nation, the second largest American Tribe.

The 20,000 square foot building houses the Cherokee National Archives, the official Archives of the Cherokee Nation, and the Library. The Library consists of over 4,000 volumes related to Cherokee History and culture, including special collections of out-of-print bibles, books in the Cherokee language, and photographs related to Indian Territory. Approximately 55 hours of oral history tapes provide other research sources.

The Cherokee National Museum current exhibits include "Deferring to Our Elders," a profile of selected Cherokee elders, and "The Printed Word," a look at Cherokee newspapers, books, and other media, from 1844-1906.


Admission: $8.50 Adults, $7.50 College Students w/ID, $7.50 Seniors (55 +), $5 Youth (5-18). Free under 5 and CNHS members.
Hours: Open daily, Mon-Sat, 10am-5pm / Sun 1pm-5pm. Closed month of January
Address: 3 miles south of Tahlequah on US Highway 62
Phone: 888-999-6007
Our Email: info@cherokeeheritage.org
Our Website:www.CherokeeHeritage.org

Come visit us in Tahlequah, Oklahoma

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