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Pushmataha County, OK

Pushmataha CountyNestling between the Jack Fork Mountains and the Kiamichi Mountains, Pushmataha County is a paradise for those who hunt, fish, and who love the out of doors. It is the heart of the deer country and the mecca for hunting and fishing.

Antlers, the county seat of Pushmataha County, named for the numerous antlers left by Indian hunters, is the gateway to the Kiamichi Mountains. The county is a popular area for fall foliage and spring dogwood tours. Nature-lovers and sportsmen alike can enjoy an abundant supply of fish, birds, and wildlife and plenty of unspoiled trails, mountains, creeks, rivers, and lakes. Be sure and look for the Potato Hills, Oklahoma's oldest geological feature.

Hunting, fishing, camping and boating are available at Sardis Lake and Clayton Lake in Clayton and Ozzie Cobb Lake near Rattan. All attractions in their own right, they are best known as bass hot-spots to fishermen. The Kiamichi and Little Rivers are particularly known for float trips, tubing, fishing and a secluded atmosphere for those wanting to get away from it all. Deer, turkey, quail and squirrel hunters are sure to appreciate the Pushmataha Wildlife Area near Clayton.

A visit to Pushmataha County would not be complete without a visit to Tuskahoma, the first political capitol of the Choctaw Nation where everyone is invited to the annual Choctaw Nation Labor Day Festival. You will see tribal dancing, Indian crafts, pow-wows and parades.

The county was named after Choctaw Chief Pushmataha (Push-ma-ta-ha) meaning "Sprout Completed." Born in 1764, Pushmataha was known in the Southwest as an outstanding individual and as a warrior. He knew very little of the parentage tradition stating he was left an orphan at an early age. Pushmataha was said to be one of nature's nobility, a man who would have adorned any society, a warrior of great distinction, wise in council and eloquent in an extraordinary degree.

Explore Pushmataha County


Antlers Springs

For no one knows how many hundreds of years, a brisk trickle of fresh mountain water has bubbled from the earth within what now are the city limits of Antlers. Long before Civil War days, adventurers and Indians and stock traders used to halt in their day'

Antlers, OK Landmarks

Wildlife Heritage Center & Museum

The Wildlife Heritage Center Museum is a 3100

Antlers, OK Nature Centers

Clayton Lake

Clayton Lake is a 95 acre hot spot for bass. Clayton Lake State Park is Open year round with 26 electric/water hookups, 33 primitive areas, restrooms/showers, sanitary dump station, picnic areas, group shelter, boat ramps/docks, swimming beach, and playground.

Clayton, OK Recreation

Old Frisco Depot

The Frisco Depot at Antlers is now under the management of the Pushmataha County Historical Society. The building had been unoccupied since 1958 and was in a sad state of disrepair until 1985 when the depot had been slowly and painstakingly restored to the state of dignity that it deserves.

Antlers, OK Railroad History

Choctaw Nation

The Choctaw Nation of Oklahoma is an American Indian Tribe organized pursuant to the provisions of the Act of June 26, 1936-49. Stat. 1967. and is federally recognized by the United States government through the Secretary of the Interior.

Tuskahoma, OK Ethnic Heritage

Outdoor Murals

"Welcome To Antlers" is represented on this building mural as you enter town from the west on Highway 3. - Artist, Lawrence, '99

Antlers, OK Arts

Antlers Tornado

On April 12 , 1945, at 5:20 pm, a tornado first touched down southwest of town near the Hall communtiy. At 5:45

Antlers, OK Monuments

Lake Ozzie Cobb

Lake Ozzie Cobb is a 116 acre lake for fishing, boating, swimming, and primitive camping. A boat ramp and restrooms are available. Open year round It is located 13 miles east of Antlers on Highway 3, near Rattan. From the Hwy. 3 and 93 junction, go 1/2 mile east to the lake sign, 2

Antlers, OK Recreation

Nanih Waiya Lake

Operated by ODWC, 31 acres, boat ramp, fishing jetty, swimming.

Clayton, OK Recreation

Medicine Springs

Medicine Springs, about 20 miles northeast of Antlers near Cloudy Mountain, has a long and interesting history. The old military road from Fort Smith to Fort Towson crossed near the springs and from 1824 until about 1860, wagon trains and stage coaches stopped overnight at the springs.

Antlers, OK Landmarks


Explore Pushmataha County