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The Cherokee National Museum


category : Museums
The Cherokee National Museum The Cherokee National Museum is the only facility devoted to the preservation of the heritage of the Cherokee Nation, the second largest American Tribe.

The 20,000 square foot building houses the Cherokee National Archives, the official Archives of the Cherokee Nation, and the Library. The Library consists of over 4,000 volumes related to Cherokee History and culture, including special collections of out-of-print bibles, books in the Cherokee language, and photographs related to Indian Territory. Approximately 55 hours of oral history tapes provide other research sources.

The Cherokee National Museum current exhibits include "Deferring to Our Elders," a profile of selected Cherokee elders, and "The Printed Word," a look at Cherokee newspapers, books, and other media, from 1844-1906.


Admission: $8.50 Adults, $7.50 College Students w/ID, $7.50 Seniors (55 +), $5 Youth (5-18). Free under 5 and CNHS members.
Hours: Open daily, Mon-Sat, 10am-5pm / Sun 1pm-5pm. Closed month of January
Address: 3 miles south of Tahlequah on US Highway 62
Phone: 888-999-6007
Our Email: info@cherokeeheritage.org
Our Website:www.CherokeeHeritage.org

Come visit us in Tahlequah, Oklahoma

Attractions and Upcoming Events

Adams Corner Rural Village

Adams Corner Rural Village is a detailed reconstruction of a small crossroads community of 1875 - 1890, in the final years of the old Cherokee Nation. The Heritage Farm exhibits livestock commonly found on Cherokee farms along with endangered domestic breeds.

Tahlequah, OK Museums

Memorial to the Confederate Dead

Erected in 1913 by the Colonial William Penn Adair Chapter of the Daughters of the Confederacy.

Tahlequah, OK Memorials

Monument to John Ross

John Ross 1790-1866

Principal Chief of the Cherokee, 1828 - 1866

Born October 3, 1790 in Turkeytown, Alabama, the son of a one-quarter Cherokee maiden and a Scotsman, John Ross was elected as the first Principal Chief of the Cherokee Indians in 1828

Tahlequah, OK Monuments

The First Telephone

Here in September, 1885, the first telephone in Oklahoma was connected for service. It was the first telephone in the Mississippi Valley west of St. Louis. The company was organized by a group of Cherokees, namely, D.W. Lipe, L.B. Bell, R.M. Wolfe, J.S. Stapler, J.B. Stapler, and E.D. Hicks.

Tahlequah, OK Markers

Monument to General Stand Watie

- In Honor of -

General Stand Watie

Tahlequah, OK Monuments

Things to do Museums near Tahlequah, OK